If the World Were 100 People

by Jörgen Eriksson on March 29, 2016

overpopulationThe population of the world as I write this, at CET 8 PM on Tuesday March 29th, 2016,  is estimated to be 7,411,904,385 people. At the dawn of agriculture, about 8000 B.C., the population of the world was approximately 5 million. Over the 8,000-year period up to 1 A.D. it grew to 200 million, with a growth rate of under 0.05% per year. At that time 45 million of those people, or in other words more than 20% of the world population, lived in the Roman Empire.

A tremendous change occurred with the industrial revolution. Higher standards of living and better healthcare increased people´s life span and allowed for larger families with more children surviving to fertile age. Whereas it had taken all of human history until around 1800 for world population to reach one billion, the second billion was achieved in only 130 years (1930), the third billion in less than 30 years (1959), the fourth billion in 15 years (1974), and the fifth billion in only 13 years (1987).

In the history of our species, the birth and death rate have always been able to balance each and maintain a population growth rate that is sustainable. Then during the 20th century alone, the population in the world grow from 1.65 billion to 6 billion, and at present we are 7,4 billion people. This overpopulation is an undesirable condition where the number of existing human population exceeds the carrying capacity of Earth.

Growing advances in technology with each coming year has affected humanity in many ways. One of these has been the ability to save lives and create better medical treatment for all. A direct result of this has been increased lifespan and the growth of the population. All humans are born equal, yet we still remain very far from equal opportunity and equal treatment of all people.

7,4 billion people. This number is so big that it is impossible to comprehend. However if we look at percentages, if the population of the world was only 100 people, what would society look like?

This is shown in the smart video here below, which is written and produced by Gabriel Reilich and released on the internet a couple of weeks ago.

If the World Were 100 People

About Jörgen Eriksson :

Jörgen Eriksson is the founder of Bearing and is the Chairman of the firm since it was created. He has successfully expanded Bearing into covering projects on four continents. He is also Adjunct Professor of Innovation Management at the International University of Monaco and at Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya in Barcelona and he is an active member of the Founders Alliance organisation.

Working with consulting engagements across Bearings practices, he has over the past fifteen years participated in and supervised a large number of client projects, from innovation system development and place development and branding, to merger and acquisition assignments and leading edge research and business development activities for key clients.

His new book, Branding for Hooligans, will be published in 2015. It is about how innovation and branding are key survival factors in our modern times of hyper competitive markets.

Prior to Bearing, he was Director of Europe, Middle East, and Africa for Trema Treasury Management, a technology and consulting services provider, supplying financial software solutions for the global financial industry, Clients included The European Central Bank, Citibank, SEB, South African reserve Bank, Deutsche Bank, Abu Dhabi Investment Authority (ADIA), as well as many other large financial institutions and Fortune 500 companies.

Early in his career Eriksson was educated at the Stockholm School of Economics, where he studied economics, financial economics and philosophy. He then worked in Scandinavian investment banks and also for the Swedish Institute of National Defense Research.

You can contact Jörgen on e-mail jorgen.eriksson@bearing-consulting.com, connect on LinkedIn on http://fr.linkedin.com/pub/jörgen-eriksson/0/38/8a0/ and follow him on twitter on joreri508.

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